Notes on digital publishing in 2014

At the beginning of 2014, some book professionals made several predictions for Ebooks and Digital Publishing, let’s take a quick look over them: • 2013 has been a good year for the development of digital publishing, however even though the largest publishers have reported digital gains, the rhythm of growth has diminished. • It seems that the power of Amazon is unstoppable, and the most recent developments over at Barnes & Noble suggest a possible closure of its digital brand, Nook. • There is going to be more big merges as we saw in 2013 with Penguin and Random House. The Russians Eksmo and AST announced their merge in January as well as the Dutch Niew Amsterdam Publishers and Wereldbibliotheek Publishers. • It seems that the streaming model is gaining territory. Although the Spanish proposal, 24 symbols, never took off in Spain, they are trying to export their model to Latin America and even Russia. In the USA, Oyster, is getting more subscribers day by day, and it is receiving good reviews from the digital experts. • Pricing will remain one of the biggest issues for publishers in the USA, while in Europe, thanks to the fixed-price law, energy is now being focused on convincing governments to reduce the tax on e-books. The industry has still to face a lot of challenges, but as we have seen during 2013, the wheel will be kept in motion in 2014 with many new proposals from both sides of the Atlantic...

eBook Subscription Models – an alternative to the traditional?

The new digital market is opening up opportunities for different models. This doesn’t mean that the old models are becoming obsolete but, in fact, that readers now have another way to access their favourite books. Let us discuss subscription models In relation to the music industry, that has endured the same transitional process, we have witnessed the birth of platforms such as Spotify or Deezer, where the audience can buy unlimited access to music for a fixed monthly fee. This model, that has been embraced by musics fans, has recently been adopted by the book market also.   One of the pioneers was a Spanish company, 24 symbols, who launched a similar subscription proposal forbooks two years ago. They started with 4 workers and now their team consists of an 18 person-strong workforce. Oyster, the American version, was launched at the beginning of this year and this summer another newbie surfaced on the Spanish market; Nubico. However, public response remains relatively weak and it’s difficult to evaluate if this alternative is really taking hold. Yesterday another, and perhaps the strongest contender, Scribd announced that 6 weeks into their ebook subscription service, things are going well though no figures have been given. What we do know is that it is becoming increasingly important for the digital book market to continually reassess and reconsider its approach and in doing so, reconstruct its model. More related reading Can Latin America’s Music Biz Still Teach Publishing Something? E-book revolution: Breaking through in the digital age Examining the Business Model of Ebook Subscription Services (Part I) Scribd’s eBook Subscription Service Hits New Milestones Russian eBook App Bookmate Offers Unlimited Access For $5...